Updated at: 09-01-2022 - By: petstutorial

Your dog is a metal licker due to its unique taste or cooling sensation, or simply because they simply love licking metal. They are attracted by metallic surfaces, and usually end up developing an habit of taking a lick. If the habit of licking gets obsessive, the pet is likely suffering from Pica.
It’s not unusual for our dogs to lick various things. It doesn’t matter if they are excitedly licking our faces when we come back from work or are licking the floor while on walking, these behavior could have a rational explanation. If you are wondering what the reason my dog likes to lick metal, you might consider the same. The occasional licking of metal objects at a time could be a good method to extract information from their environment. The habit of licking frequently is to indicate an obsessive disorder.

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Reasons Why Does My Dog Lick Metal?

1. Your Dog Has Pica

Based on Pet MD, Pica is an illness in dogs which causes them to impulsively take in food items. Some dogs focus on one item, while other are drawn to a range of objects. Your dog might be obsessed with metal and the metal is licking.
It’s difficult to pinpoint the reason behind Pica. It could be anything related to nutritional deficiencies or health issues such as diabetes or thyroid.
To manage pica, you have two options to identify any behavioral or mental problem , or in the case of none, you can prevent the development of pica.
Nutritional deficiencies, for instance, are easily treated by making small changes to the diet of your dog. Problems with behavior, on the other on the other hand, can be dealt with by providing an exercise for your dog by using an chew toy such as Durable Dog Chew Toy to keep him active.
If you are unable to determine the primary cause for your dog’s picturea, you can stop the condition by removing the metallic substance that your dog is fond of licking.

2. Your Dog Likes The Taste Of Paint

If the object made of metal that your dog is eating is lately painted, it is possible that your pet could be attracted by it due to its flavor. Paints made from lead are said to taste similar like strawberries.
To prevent this excessive licking , attempt spraying your object Bitter Apple Spray for Dogs and let your dog play with it. The spray, which is non-toxic, contains a bitter taste which dogs find unpleasant. If your dog sees the object as having an unpleasant flavor and stops licking it, the dog will stop.
If this method doesn’t work, you should consult your vet for any health issues.

3. Your Dog Is Licking Something On The Metal

The most obvious reason your dog is licking metal could be due to spilled food or drink on the metal. Another motive could be to get a lick of another pet’s urine so that you can understand the information of another pet. This can be more apparent in the case of bringing home an animal that is new.
The dogs also lick their own urine occasionally to wash away the evidence of peeing inside.
Based on Dr.Wailani Sung DVM Dr.Wailani Sung, DVM: These are reasons dogs consume Poop:

  • Nursing
  • They enjoy the flavor
  • You may feel unwell.
  • They suffer from anxiety.
  • They’d like to be noticed

Therefore, you can anticipate your pet to chew the metal to get rid of his waste, or any other pet’s waste.

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4. Your Dog Is Lacking Some Nutrients

The dog’s dietary needs are met by organic materials , rather than metallic objects. If your dog has an nutrient deficiency, it might seek to lick objects order to get the missing nutrients. Most of the time, it’s due to a mineral deficiency that causes dogs to lick metal objects.

5. Your Dog Just Likes The Taste Of Metal!

Domestic dogs are attracted to metal objects due to the fact that they love the cool feeling of metal, or simply enjoy the taste of metal. Sometimes it may become a habit that can cause problems for you, but sometimes it’s an occasional discomfort.
If the disorder of compulsive behavior becomes difficult for your dog you may seek help from a vet behaviorist to address the behavior.

6. Your Dog Is Anemic

Dogs with low levels of red blood cells are often prone to rub metal objects because of the smell of iron in an effort to boost the iron levels. If your dog has recently begun to lick metal, you need to have his red blood cell count tested to determine whether he’s anemic.
The Dr. Denish suggests that if you think your dog is suffering from anemia then you should look at the eyes and gums of your dog. The results of the test should reveal pink conjunctiva. In the event that your pet’s eyes appear pale or white it could indicate anemia. The gums must also be a healthy , pink color in contrast to those with pale gums in a dog suffering from anemia.
It is tempting to feed ferrous supplements for your pet in order to boost the levels of iron in your dog, but do not do it.
According to Dr.By Rania Gollakner at VCA hospitals, it is not advised to feed ferrous supplements for your pet as excessive iron can upset the stomach of the dog and lead to vomiting and diarrhea. It could even lead to the liver to fail in severe circumstances.

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7. Your Dog Is Curious

The dogs are curious animals who love to lick and sniff to better understand their surroundings. As humans, dogs don’t have hands that can pick things up and are awed by them. Your dog isn’t able to use its paw to lift objects that are interesting to it.
To investigate an object of interest Your dog will make use of the sense of smell and taste.
If the metal object does not contain poisonous substances, there’s no harm to your pet taking a bite. However, it is recommended to not allow your dog to lick any metal since it is a magnet for bacteria and dirt that could cause harm to your pet.

8. Your Dog Is Bored

Animals with no activities to engage in often succumb to boredom, and will find various ways to entertain themselves. This can include licking metal since metal surfaces can be appealing in taste to dogs. In time the desire to lick for fun transforms into an obsessional-compulsive disorder within your dog.
A study by biologist Charlotte C. Burn from the University of London says that “Boredom isn’t the baffling nuisance that it is often dismissed as. Boredom in animals is plausible biologically that is, animals are not bored and are attracted by stimulation.”
To keep your dog amused You can hide some snacks in your home which your dog can search for after you go you. You can also hide the treats inside an snuffle mat, such as the Wool pet Snuffle Mat. It is also possible to give rotating chew toys for your pet to keep him entertained. Your dog’s bed should be in an active corner with the window could also be a good idea.

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