Updated at: 25-12-2021 - By: petexpert

If your dog has ever shattered his teeth, then it could be due to some very normal reasons. Teeth chattering is a reasonably common behavior amongst dogs but will arouse curiosity in us owners. Health concerns can pop to mind, as well as sinister diseases and other nasty illnesses.

It’s only natural that new and strange behavior like chattering teeth would set alarm bells ringing. It did for me as a dog owner, so I researched what it meant online, and here’s what I found. Bear in mind, this is what I have discovered – I am not a vet, so please check with a professional

Why-Is-My-Dog-Chattering-His-Teeth-2.jpg

 

It might seem bizarre, but a lot of dogs chatter their teeth almost like they’re in a fast-paced cartoon. Dogs’ teeth might be jittering, clacking or clicking. It can be alarming, or at the very least surprising. Should a pet parent be worried about this? The answer is maybe. To explain, let’s first answer the question, “Why do dogs chatter their teeth?”

The most common reasons why dogs chatter their teeth

Similar to humans, dogs will chatter or otherwise chomp, grind, or move their teeth in a reaction to different stimuli. Most of the reasons for teeth-chattering are harmless and are merely an impulse or habit that your dog has picked up over time.

Therefore, you should not immediately panic if your beloved pooch begins to display this behavior. Instead, you should take a deep breath, relax, and try to figure out if they are chattering their teeth because they are cold, or for other common reasons. In this section, we will provide a list of what these reasons could be

Decreases in body temperature

By far, the most common cause for why dogs chatter their teeth is a decrease in body temperature and warmth. Like humans, primates, and other mammals, dogs shiver to keep themselves warm, regardless of whether they have a thick coat or not However, to better understand how and why this affects the teeth, it is worth taking a look at how shivering works in the first place.

Why-Is-My-Dog-Chattering-His-Teeth-1.jpg

When a mammal’s core body temperature drops, a response is triggered by the brain that tells the body to start shaking the skeletal muscles in small movements. These small movements expend energy, creating additional warmth and helping the animal retain homeostasis in the process; essentially a balanced and stable internal state that is unaffected by the temperature outside.

If your dog has ever shattered his teeth, then it could be due to some very normal reasons. Teeth chattering is a reasonably common behavior amongst dogs but will arouse curiosity in us owners. Health concerns can pop to mind, as well as sinister diseases and other nasty illnesses.

It’s only natural that new and strange behavior like chattering teeth would set alarm bells ringing. It did for me as a dog owner, so I researched what it meant online, and here’s what I found. Bear in mind, this is what I have discovered – I am not a vet, so please check with a professional.

The most common reasons why dogs chatter their teeth Similar to humans, dogs will chatter or otherwise chomp, grind, or move their teeth in a reaction to different stimuli. Most of the reasons for teeth-chattering are harmless and are merely an impulse or habit that your dog has picked up over time.

Therefore, you should not immediately panic if your beloved pooch begins to display this behavior. Instead, you should take a deep breath, relax, and try to figure out if they are chattering their teeth because they are cold, or for other common reasons. In this section, we will provide a list of what these reasons could be.

How Are the Causes of Teeth Chattering Treated?

Many (perhaps most) dogs who exhibit teeth-chattering behavior do not require any treatment at all. This includes dogs who chatter while excited or sniffing patches of particularly impressive pee-pee.

Others may only require that you make very small tweaks to their care or daily routine. If your dog is chattering because of the cold, for example, you may just need to get him a coat for going outside or a heated bed to keep him cozy at night.

Dogs who chatter because of fear or anxiety will require treatment that is proportional to the severity of their symptoms. For example, those who chatter in stressful social situations may simply need to find a more relaxed group of playmates to feel better and put an end to the chattering. But, if your dog suffers from generalized anxiety, medications or behavioral therapy may be required.

If your dog has a dental problem, your vet can perform various techniques to fix the problem. This may include drilling or pulling teeth or performing gum surgery. Your dog may need a few days to recover from the procedure before he stops chattering completely, but by fixing the problem, your dog will likely stop once he feels better

Chattering that precipitates from a neurological cause is not always treatable, although medications may help stop some types of seizures. You’ll just have to work with your vet in such cases to achieve the best possible outcome for your dog.

Dental issues and gum disease

Unfortunately, dental issues can quickly become a problem for older dogs. Due to their advanced age, elderly dogs are likely to experience problems with their dental health, ranging from broken teeth, cavities, and sore gums.

However, one of the most common conditions that affect them is an extremely painful form of gum disease called periodontal disease. This condition occurs when bacteria forms and grows in small gaps between the teeth and gums, causing bleeding and irritation and in severe cases, even the loss of teeth.

Teeth-chattering can often be your dog’s way of coping with dental pain, as most canines are reluctant to show signs of weakness. If you suspect your dog has this disease, take them to the vet as soon as possible.

Why-Is-My-Dog-Chattering-His-Teeth-3.jpg

Conclusion

I am not a vet, so please do ask yours if you are at all worried about why your dog is chattering his teeth. It’s better to have the peace of mind in a professional opinion. Everything on this page is my own online research.

Rate this post